Articles Posted in Gender Discrimination

Lev Craig

On May 3, 2017, in Philpott v. State of New York, the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York refused to dismiss sexual orientation discrimination claims brought under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). Judge Alvin K. Hellerstein of the Southern District of New York joined a growing number of courts across the country in finding sexual orientation discrimination cognizable under Title VII, stating, “I decline to embrace an illogical and artificial distinction between gender stereotyping discrimination and sexual orientation discrimination.”

Plaintiff Jeffery Philpott was employed at the SUNY College of Optometry as Vice President of Student Affairs, where, according to his complaint, he was subjected to years of discrimination and harassment because he is gay. Philpott alleges that his supervisors and coworkers mockingly called him “sensitive” and “flamboyant,” told him that “separate but equal treatment of gay people might be best,” dismissively referred to his relationship with his long-term domestic partner as “this marriage, or whatever you want to call it,” and refused to let him meet their families because they did not “want our children to be around homosexuality.” In addition, SUNY allegedly excluded him from meetings and projects because of his sexual orientation and implied that he deserved a lower salary because he is gay, telling him that “your team [i.e., gay people] doesn’t have kids. You have more than you need.” Shortly after Philpott complained to SUNY of the ongoing discrimination, Philpott claims, SUNY terminated his employment. Philpott filed a charge of discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), then filed suit in federal court, alleging hostile work environment, wrongful termination, and retaliation claims under Title VII.

Lev Craig and Harrison Paige

On March 27, 2017, the United States Circuit Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit reversed and remanded in part and affirmed in part the district court’s decision in Christiansen v. Omnicom Group, Incorporated, et al. Plaintiff Matthew Christiansen brought claims against his former employer under the Americans with Disabilities Act (“ADA”) and Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”), alleging discrimination on the basis of his HIV-positive status and his failure to conform to gender stereotypes. The lower court dismissed Christiansen’s federal claims for failure to state a claim; the Second Circuit upheld the dismissal of the ADA claim, but reversed the dismissal of the Title VII claim, finding that Christiansen had plausibly alleged a Title VII gender stereotyping claim.

Christiansen, an openly gay man who is HIV-positive, was the creative director for DDB Worldwide Communications Group Incorporated (“DDB”), an international advertising agency and Omnicom subsidiary. According to the complaint, Christian’s direct supervisor, Joe Cianciotto, subjected Christiansen to a “pattern of humiliating harassment targeting his effeminacy and sexual orientation.” Cianciotto allegedly drew offensive, obscene caricatures of Christiansen on an office whiteboard, the most explicit of which depicted Christiansen naked with an erection, captioned with a mocking comment about same-sex marriage. On another occasion, according to the complaint, Cianciotto created a “Muscle Beach Party” poster, which he circulated amongst office members and posted on Facebook, displaying DDB employees’ heads photoshopped onto the bodies of people in swimwear; on the poster, Christiansen’s head was pasted onto a photo of a woman in a bikini, lying on the ground with her legs upright in the air “in a manner that one coworker thought depicted Christiansen as ‘a submissive sissy.’”

Lev Craig

Earlier this month, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed in part and vacated and remanded in part the district court’s decision in Evans v. Georgia Regional Hospital, holding that Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”) does not prohibit sexual orientation discrimination in the workplace.

Jameka Evans worked at Georgia Regional Hospital (the “Hospital”) in Atlanta, Georgia, as a security officer. Evans, who is a lesbian, had a masculine gender presentation at work: she wore the men’s security officer uniform, men’s shoes, and a short, masculine haircut. According to Evans’ complaint, the Hospital discriminated against her because of her sexual orientation and because she did not behave in a “traditional woman[ly] manner.” Evans alleged that she was denied equal pay, harassed, physically assaulted, targeted for termination, and retaliated against after making a complaint of discrimination to the Hospital’s Human Resources department.

Shelby Krzastek

On March 8, 2017, Anita Poe-Smith filed suit against Epic Health Services, Inc. (“Epic”), and Leo and Sherrie Weigand, alleging sexual harassment and retaliation. Ms. Poe-Smith works for Epic as a home health aide.

In February 2015, Epic assigned Ms. Poe-Smith to work for a client residing in the home of Leo and Sherrie Weigand. Ms. Poe-Smith claims that from February 2015 to May 2015, Mr. Weigand sexually harassed her by directing sexual innuendos and inappropriate comments toward her and, ultimately, physically assaulting her when, according to Ms. Poe-Smith, Mr. Weigand pushed her down and hit her on her buttocks. After reporting the incident to Epic, Ms. Poe-Smith was offered a new assignment, which she was unable to accept because it interfered with her familial obligations. Several weeks later, Epic offered her another full-time assignment, which she accepted. Ms. Poe-Smith then sued Epic Health Services and the homeowners for sexual harassment and retaliation.

Harrison Paige and Lev Craig

On February 27, 2017, the United States Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit affirmed the lower court’s ruling in Kalu v. Florida Department of Children and Families, a gender discrimination suit brought under the Equal Pay Act (“EPA”). The Eleventh Circuit affirmed the district court’s summary judgment in favor of the defendant, a Florida state hospital, finding that plaintiffs—two female nurse practitioners at the hospital—had failed to show that a $20,000 disparity between their pay and a male nurse practitioner’s salary constituted unlawful gender discrimination in violation of the EPA.

Plaintiffs Patricia Kalu and Susan Linder-Wyatt worked as nurse practitioners at a hospital managed by the Florida Department of Children and Families. When plaintiffs discovered that they made nearly $20,000 less than Michael Peel, a male nurse practitioner with identical job responsibilities, they filed suit in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida, alleging that the pay disparity between female and male nurse practitioners violated the EPA. The district court granted summary judgment, finding that plaintiffs had failed to show that the hospital’s pay disparity was discriminatory, and plaintiffs appealed to the Eleventh Circuit.

Lev Craig

On Wednesday, President Trump rescinded protections implemented by the Obama administration which had, among other things, allowed transgender students to use the school restrooms and facilities corresponding with their gender identities.

Title IX of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title IX) prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex in federally funded education programs, but does not explicitly protect transgender individuals. Last May, the Obama administration issued guidance regarding transgender students to all public schools in the U.S. in a joint letter from the Departments of Justice and Education. The guidance stated that both departments interpret Title IX’s prohibition against sex discrimination as encompassing “discrimination based on a student’s gender identity, including discrimination based on a student’s transgender status” and that the departments “treat a student’s gender identity as the student’s sex for purposes of Title IX and its implementing regulations.” Effectively, the guidance required schools to treat transgender students the same as non-transgender students of the same gender for Title IX purposes—for example, schools could not subject transgender girls to different rules and policies than non-transgender girls—and prohibited schools from discriminating against students on the basis of transgender status.

Shelby Krzastek

Bikram Choudhury is an Indian yoga teacher and the founder of Bikram yoga. In recent years, Choudhury has been surrounded by controversy amid allegations of discrimination, harassment, and sexual assault, resulting in multiple lawsuits. On Tuesday, December 13, 2016, a California judge ordered that Bikram Choudhury’s income and ownership of his signature yoga college be turned over to Minakshi Jafa-Bodden to satisfy a $6.7 million judgment in her sexual harassment case against him.

Minakshi Jafa-Bodden, Choudhury’s former in-house attorney, filed a sexual harassment and wrongful termination suit against Choudhury in 2013. According to Jafa-Bodden’s complaint, Choudhury degraded and harassed female students and employees, forced Jafa-Bodden to meet with him in his hotel room at night while female students massaged him, and, on one occasion, insisted that Jafa-Bodden join him on his bed during a meeting. Jafa-Bodden claims that, in addition to the sexual harassment she faced, Choudhury retaliated against her for investigating sexual assault allegations against him. In recent years, Choudhury has been surrounded by controversy amid allegations of discrimination, harassment, and sexual assault, resulting in multiple lawsuits.

In January, after a 12-day trial resulting in a verdict in Jafa-Bodden’s favor, a jury awarded Jafa-Bodden $4.6 million in punitive damages and nearly $1 million in compensatory damages for harassment she experienced while working at Choudhury’s Los Angeles headquarters. The jury also found in Jafa-Bodden’s favor with respect to her unlawful termination claim, finding that her complaints to higher-ups at Choudhury’s organization about the ongoing sexual harassment and gender discrimination had been a substantial reason for her termination.

Yet after the trial verdict, Choudhury refused to pay any of the award—and, in fact, fled the United States to avoid payment of this judgment. Earlier this month, on Tuesday, December 13, 2016, Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Mark A. Borenstein approved Jafa-Bodden’s request to divert to her the income Choudhury receives from agreements with vendors, yoga studio franchise agreements, and royalty and licensing payments based on his trademark, copyrights, and other intellectual property. The Court also granted a charging order to give Jafa-Bodden her former employer’s ownership interest in Bikram Yoga College of India.

Judge Borenstein also signed off on the appointment of a post-judgment receiver tasked with seizing and selling Choudhury’s trademarks, copyrights, and web domain names. Jafa-Bodden is also seeking several dozen luxury vehicles allegedly owned by Choudhury to satisfy the judgment, along with his diamond-encrusted watch and any remaining stocks or other investments of which he retains control.

All employees have the right to a workplace free of sexual harassment and gender discrimination. If you have been the victim of sexual harassment or gender discrimination in the workplace, contact the experienced employment attorneys at The Harman Firm, LLP. Continue Reading

Edgar M. Rivera, Esq.

On November 4, 2016, the Western District of Pennsylvania—joining the Middle District of Alaska, District of the District of Columbia, District of Oregon, and Central District of California—held that a gay person has standing to bring a sex discrimination claim under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (Title VII). In EEOC v. Scott Medical Health Center, the Complainant, Dale Baxley, alleges that his supervisor, Robert McClendon, Scott Medical Health Center’s telemarketing manager, subjected him to a hostile work environment because he is a gay man. After Scott Medical Health Center’s president and chief executive officer allegedly ignored his complaint about the discrimination and harassment, Mr. Baxley quit.

In the complaint, Mr. Baxley alleges that Mr. McClendon called him a “fag,” “faggot,” “fucking faggot,” and “queer,” and, after learning that Mr. Baxley had a male partner, made statements such as “I always wondered how you fags have sex,” “I don’t understand how you fucking fags have sex,” and “Who’s the butch and who is the bitch?” The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) argued that Title VII covered this type of harassment as, had it not been but for Mr. Baxley’s sex, he would not have been subjected to this harassment. The court agreed, stating that Title VII’s “because of sex” provision prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation.

Shelby Krzastek

Women currently hold only 4.4% of Fortune 500 CEO roles; Yahoo! Inc. CEO Marissa Mayer is one of them. In October, Scott Ard, Yahoo’s former editorial director, filed a lawsuit against Mayer in federal court in San Jose, California, alleging that Mayer and other female Yahoo executives—including Kathy Savitt, Yahoo’s former chief marketing officer, and Megan Liberman, Yahoo News’ current editor-in-chief—had discriminated against male Yahoo employees because of their gender.

When Mayer began at Yahoo, only 20% of top managers and chief editors were female. Within a year and a half of Mayer’s assuming leadership of Yahoo, however, top managers were more than 80% female. Similarly, of the approximately 16 senior-level editorial employees hired or promoted by Savitt over an 18-month period, 14 were women. Ard claims that female Yahoo executives intentionally hired and promoted women and terminated or demoted male employees solely on the basis of their genders.

Owen H. Laird, Esq.

The Harman Firm blog often reports on cases of “glass ceiling” gender discrimination. These cases involve circumstances where women in the workplace are prevented from reaching higher-level positions due to their gender. This type of discrimination can take place anywhere; major law firms, pharmaceutical companies, and tech companies are just a few recent examples. The phenomenon is pervasive across the economy and hinders women seeking to advance their careers.

Recently, the New York Times reported on a similar obstacle facing women at the helm of both corporations and governments: the “glass cliff.” This theory was developed in the early 2000s in response to studies showing that corporations that appointed women to their boards tended to experience a drop in share price shortly thereafter.