Articles Posted in Freelance

Lev Craig

On April 12, 2017, the Second Circuit affirmed the district court’s decision in Saleem v. Corporate Transportation Group, Ltd., finding that a group of black-car drivers had been properly classified as independent contractors under the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and New York Labor Law (NYLL). The court held that the drivers’ significant degree of independence prevented them from establishing that they were employees within the meaning of the FLSA or NYLL.

Under New York law, black cars are defined as a “type of for‐hire vehicle (along with livery vehicles and limousines) that provide ground transportation by prearrangement with customers.” The Saleem plaintiffs are a group of black-car drivers serving clients throughout the tri-state area; the defendants were operators and administrators of a black-car dispatch, which sells black-car franchises to individual drivers and refers the dispatcher’s clients to the driver. Each driver signed an agreement with a franchisor, stating that the driver was not an “employee or agent” but instead a “subscriber to [the franchisor’s] services offered,” that the driver would “at all times be free from [the franchisor’s] control or direction,” and that the franchisor would not “control, supervise or direct” the driver’s work. The agreements did not prohibit drivers from transporting customers for other companies, including competitors, but did require that drivers comply with policies set out by each franchisor, such as rules concerning dress code and vehicle cleanliness.

Lev Craig

Last week, we blogged about proposed legislation that would open up health insurance benefits to New Yorkers who are members of the so-called “gig economy,” an emergent employment sector that is moving away from traditional employer-employee relationships in favor of short-term, task-based work. The New York City Council recently passed the Freelance Isn’t Free Act, a new bill—the first of its kind in the country—which creates protections for gig economy workers and freelancers in the New York metropolitan area.

A “gig” is defined by the U.S. Department of Labor as a “single project or task for which a worker is hired, often through a digital marketplace, to work on demand. While gig jobs and career paths have always existed—music, for instance, or graphic design—technological developments in the past decade have made it unprecedentedly easy for companies and clients to connect with a network of freelancers via websites and mobile apps. Services like Uber and TaskRabbit allow workers to pick up individual gigs, like driving a client to a destination or cleaning a client’s apartment, at their discretion. Nontraditional employment arrangements constitute a rapidly growing share of the labor force: a 2014 survey found that 34% of U.S. workers were engaged in some type of freelance work. Freelance work is particularly popular in the New York metropolitan area, which is home to an estimated nearly 4 million freelancers.